deming.ipub.us http://deming.ipub.us en-US http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss socportals@mediacolo.com A new pro-impeachment TV ad boils Mueller#039;s 6 hours of testimony down to 32 seconds Billionaire Tom Steyer will not be on the debate stage with his fellow Democratic presidential candidates Tuesday or Wednesday night, but a pro-impeachment organization he bankrolls, Need to Impeach, will be spending somewhere in the mid-six-figures to air a new 32-second ad on CNN and MSNBC before and after the debates, Politico reported Tuesday morning. The commercial, called "What Mueller Said," is the first paid advertising featuring former Special Counsel Robert Mueller's high-profile testimony before two House committees last week. "Mueller was panned last week for being short in his testimony before Congress, giving little ammo to Democrats who wanted to capitalize politically from his appearance," Politico reports, but this new ad by Mark Putnam condenses Mueller's six hours of terse answers into 32 seconds of dramatic testimony, at least from the Democratic point of view. That's no small feat: The hearings themselves were something of a critical and ratings disappointment. The new ad features questions from House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), Rep. Val Demings (D-Fla.), and House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), and "it will be very much talked about in the next few days," Politico predicts. Watch below. http://deming.ipub.us/news/2844780-new-pro-impeachment-tv-ad-boils-mueller039s-6-hours-testimon Tue, 30 2019 12:28:00 GMT http://deming.ipub.us/news/2844780-new-pro-impeachment-tv-ad-boils-mueller039s-6-hours-testimon #039;A f---ing travesty#039;: Justice Department veterans say the way Mueller#039;s testimony was handled completely blew past the #039;historical significance of this moment#039; Justice Department veterans are deeply frustrated with the way politicians handled the former special counsel Robert Mueller's historic testimony this week, and how it was later covered by the media. "The debate people are having right now is about style rather than substance," Elie Honig, a former prosecutor from the Southern District of New York, told INSIDER. "Why should that matter? Look at what he said." A former senior Justice Department official who worked closely with Mueller when he was FBI director echoed that view, telling INSIDER the way Mueller's hearings were handled "was a f---ing travesty." "The criticism that everyone has is that Mueller refuses to reduce his report to a soundbyte," said former federal prosecutor Patrick Cotter. "And with all this circus over who won and who lost and how Mueller performed, we've blown past the historical significance of this moment." Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories. The Russian government interfered in the 2016 US election in a "sweeping and systematic" fashion to propel Donald Trump to the presidency. The Trump campaign welcomed the intrusion. Trump and his associates tried to weaponize their political positions for financial gain. After assuming office, Trump significantly obstructed the investigation into Russia's meddling on nearly a dozen occasions. He ordered the White House counsel to fire the man investigating him. He urged witnesses not to cooperate with prosecutors. And contrary to his repeated assertions, he was not "totally and completely exonerated" of wrongdoing. The former special counsel Robert Mueller testified to these findings before Congress this week, but none of it was actually news. Nearly everything the former FBI director told lawmakers was plucked directly from the 448-page report that the Justice Department released in April. At a news conference the next month when he formally closed the investigation, Mueller told reporters that if he were forced to testify before Congress, he would not go beyond what was contained in the document because "the report is my testimony." So it surprised — and frustrated — Justice Department veterans when politicians and pundits were disappointed that Mueller's six-hour testimony this week wasn't more theatrical. Read more: The Senate Intelligence Committee just released the first volume of its final report on Russian interference in the 2016 US election Mueller 'behaved like a dignified man who didn't want to be turned into some sort of performing monkey' "Anybody who was disappointed by Mueller's performance simply wasn't paying attention," Patrick Cotter, a former federal prosecutor who has worked with members of Mueller's team, told INSIDER. Elie Honig, a former prosecutor from the Southern District of New York, told INSIDER that "the debate people are having right now is about style rather than substance." "Let's take away the superficiality of whether he looked assured, or whether he hesitated, or looked too old, or if he fired off his answers quickly enough," he said. "Why should that matter? Look at what he said." Read more: The 7 biggest takeaways from Mueller's marathon Capitol Hill testimony Cotter also contrasted Mueller's report with that of former Whitewater independent counsel Ken Starr. The Whitewater investigation started as a probe of former president Bill Clinton and former first lady Hillary Clinton's real estate investments. But the matter quickly ballooned to include explicit details of the president's personal life and his affair with the former White House intern Monica Lewinsky. The Starr report "was a perversion of what a prosecutor should do, and it went for the lurid details instead of staying within its scope, and it was blatantly partisan," Cotter said. "Mueller's report was the opposite," he added. "It is a model of clarity. It's well written, it's well organized, he hit the main points over and over again, there are summaries and previews, it's all there. He behaved like a dignified man who didn't want to be turned into some sort of performing monkey." 'One slip of the tongue could be used to undermine his team's work' When he could, Mueller stuck with "yes" and "no" answers, or he directed lawmakers to read the report themselves. He demurred when asked to read aloud portions of the document himself, and he flatly refused to discuss topics that strayed from his mandate or were currently under investigation. "As a prosecutor, he had to ensure he stayed detached from the political process, presenting his findings in a manner that did not make it appear he was choosing a side or advancing an agenda," Renato Mariotti, another longtime former federal prosecutor, noted in Politico Magazine. "One slip of the tongue could be used to undermine his team's work." Mariotti added that even though Mueller's monotonal answers may not have made for dramatic TV, "they weren't without effect." At one point, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff walked Mueller through a particularly incriminating line of questioning, in which he got Mueller to confirm, with one or two-word answers, that Russia wanted to help Trump win in 2016, that Trump and his campaign encouraged the effort, and that Trump lied to the public about his financial dealings in Russia. In another instance, Democratic Rep. Val Demings got Mueller to confirm that the president was "generally" untruthful in his written answers to prosecutors' questions. Elsewhere, Mueller said that welcoming foreign assistance in an election is "unpatriotic" and "wrong," and that "problematic would be an understatement" in reference to Trump's effusive praise of WikiLeaks. Among other things, he also revealed that some members of Trump's inner circle are still under counterintelligence investigation. Read more: 'The death rattle for impeachment': Republicans take a victory lap after Mueller's testimony misses Democrats' expectations 'It was a f---ing travesty' Given the substance of Mueller's testimony, former officials expressed frustration with the media's coverage of the hearings. "Everything we saw in the aftermath was about Mueller asking for questions to be repeated, how it played for the Democrats, how it looked for Republicans, whether this was good or bad for the president," a former senior Justice Department official who worked closely with Mueller when he was FBI director told INSIDER. "And very little was about the value of what Mueller said and what's in his report. It was a f---ing travesty." Cotter echoed that view. "What should have been a very serious, very important inquiry into an attack on our democracy from outside — and from within, reaching to the very highest levels of our government — was treated as a TV show, and it was reviewed as though Mueller was an actor in a play," he said. "The criticism that everyone has is that Mueller refuses to reduce his report to a soundbyte," Cotter added. "He won't lie. He won't pervert. He won't take something complex and present it as simple. And with all this circus over who won and who lost and how Mueller performed, we've blown past the historical significance of this moment."SEE ALSO: The 7 biggest takeaways from Mueller's marathon Capitol Hill testimony Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: A year after Armenia's 250,000-person revolution, Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan explains what comes next for the country http://deming.ipub.us/news/2838062-039-f-ing-travesty039-justice-department-veterans-say-way-mu Fri, 26 2019 18:31:31 GMT http://deming.ipub.us/news/2838062-039-f-ing-travesty039-justice-department-veterans-say-way-mu Here are the 87 congressional Democrats and 9 additional Democratic presidential candidates who want to begin an impeachment inquiry against Trump Internal tensions over whether to impeach President Donald Trump are brewing among House Democrats, and more members are openly coming out in favor of impeachment with every passing day.  The fervor for impeachment has only intensified as the Trump administration ramped up its stonewalling of Congress' attempts to investigate the president since the release of the special counsel Robert Mueller's report.  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democratic leaders have indicated they believe impeachment would be too divisive.  On May 29, Mueller gave a press conference at the DOJ announcing his formal resignation, re-iterating the conclusions of his report's findings, and declining to voluntarily testify before Congress. Mueller made it clear in his remarks that his office could not have indicted Trump because of existing DOJ policy, leaving the next steps up to Congress.  Here are the 87 currently-serving House Democrats and nine additional Democratic presidential candidates who have openly come out in favor of beginning an impeachment inquiry. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Internal tensions over whether to impeach President Donald Trump are brewing among House Democrats — and more members are openly coming out in favor of impeachment with every passing day.  Rep. Rashida Tlaib of Michigan introduced a resolution in favor of impeachment in late March with just a few cosponsors, but the release of special counsel Robert Mueller's report from his nearly two-year-long investigations and its aftermath have increased the appetite for impeaching Trump. The report did not come to a "traditional prosecutorial decision" as to whether Trump obstructed the Mueller probe and other federal investigations involving him, but laid out 11 possible incidents of obstruction and left it to Congress to decide.  The fervor for impeachment has only intensified as the Trump administration ramped up its stonewalling of Congress' attempts to investigate Trump since the report's release.  Read more: The DOJ agreed to turn over key evidence from Mueller's obstruction case one day before a scheduled contempt vote against AG William Barr On May 29, Mueller gave a press conference at the DOJ announcing his formal resignation, re-iterating the conclusions of his report's findings, and declining to voluntarily testify before Congress.  Mueller made it explicitly clear that the report did not exonerate Trump, and that his office had no ability to charge Trump with a crime given existing DOJ policy prohibiting prosecutors from indicting a sitting president — leaving the next steps up to Congress.  While Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other top Democrats say they believe an impeachment inquiry would divide the country and end up playing into Trump's hands, a consensus is forming among other Democrats that impeachment is a necessary next step. Democratic leaders came under more pressure to consider impeachment when a Republican congressman, Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan, risked his seat and his political career to call for impeaching Trump. Here are the 87 currently-serving House Democrats and nine additional Democratic presidential candidates who have openly come out in favor of beginning an impeachment inquiry against Trump.  SEE ALSO: Impeachment doesn't mean what you think it means — here's what it would take to remove Trump from office On May 30, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont said "this president must be held accountable and I believe that the Judiciary Committee should begin impeachment inquiries,” according to CNN. Source: Jake Tapper/CNN Read more about Bernie Sanders' campaign. Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper said on May 30 that he supports Congress opening an impeachment inquiry, adding, "that doesn't mean we're going to impeach President Trump...but I do think we have an obligation to follow where the facts lead." Source: Stephanie Ramirez/CBS Read more about John Hickenlooper's campaign.   Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey was previously skeptical of impeachment, but changed course and tweeted "Congress has a legal and moral obligation to begin impeachment proceedings immediately" after Mueller gave a press conference reiterating the conclusions of his report on May 29. Source: Cory Booker/Twitter Read more about Cory Booker's campaign. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York also called for impeachment the day of Mueller's press conference, tweeting, "Robert Mueller clearly expects Congress to exercise its constitutional authority and take steps that he could not." Source: Kirsten Gillibrand Read more about Kirsten Gillibrand's campaign. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts became the first 2020 presidential candidate to come out in favor of impeachment shortly after the release of the Mueller report. Source: Business Insider Read more about Elizabeth Warren's campaign. Sen. Kamala Harris of California said the House should start "taking steps towards impeachment" after the Mueller report's release, later tweeting that Mueller "basically an impeachment referral" and calling impeachment a "constitutional obligation" on May 29. Sources: Business Insider, Kamala Harris/Twitter Read more about Kamala Harris' campaign. Former HUD Secretary and 2020 candidate Julián Castro also said it would be "perfectly reasonable" for Congress to begin impeachment proceedings. Source: Business Insider Read more about Julian Castro's campaign Former Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas, also seeking the 2020 Democratic nomination, came out in favor of beginning impeachment proceedings at a May 21 CNN town hall. Source: CNN Read more about Beto O'Rourke's campaign. Presidential candidate Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington recently told the New York Daily News that he supports the beginning of an impeachment inquiry, calling Trump "a threat to national security." Source: New York Daily News Read more about Jay Inslee's campaign. Rep. Eric Swalwell, a member of the House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees, supports impeaching Trump and Attorney General Bill Barr. Source: Eric Swalwell   Rep. Seth Moulton of Massachusetts, also a 2020 candidate, supports impeachment inquiries into both Trump and Barr. Sources: NPR, The Hill Read more about Seth Moulton.  Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio, both a member of the House and a 2020 candidate, said at a June 2 CNN town hall that he believes the Judiciary Committee should begin an impeachment inquiry. Source: The Hill In the House, Rep. Al Green became one of the very first Democrats to put forth impeachment articles back in 2017 with four other Democrats, but their resolution to impeach Trump was rejected. Source: Texas Tribune Rep. Steve Cohen of Tennessee was one of the co-sponsors of Green's impeachment resolution. Source: Rep. Steve Cohen Rep. Marcia Fudge of Ohio also co-sponsored the 2017 impeachment resolution. Source: Cleveland.com Rep. Adriano Espaillat of New York also co-sponsored Green's 2017 impeachment articles. Source: Adriano Espaillat Rep. Nanette Barragán of California voted for the 2017 impeachment resolution against Trump. Source: Nanette Barragán Rep. Yvette Clarke of New York also voted for Green's impeachment resolution. Source: Need To Impeach Rep. Maxine Waters of California, the chairwoman of the House Financial Services Committee, has also been a long-time supporter of impeaching Trump. Source: The Hill Rep. Brad Sherman of California introduced articles of impeachment — H.R. 13 — along with Rep. Green in January of 2019. Sources: CNN, Congress.gov In March of this year, freshman Rep. Rashida Tlaib of Michigan introduced her own resolution to impeach Trump with Green as a co-sponsor. Source: CNN Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York became a co-sponsor of Tlaib's resolution in April and, tweeted on Tuesday that "failure to impeach now is neglect of due process." Sources: CBS, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota is also a cosponsor of Tlaib's resolution and recently tweeted "it’s time Democrats open an impeachment inquiry against the current occupant of the White House." Source: Ilhan Omar Rep. Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts also co-sponsored Tlaib's resolution and recently told MSNBC, "I didn't come to Congress to impeach a president...but I believe we have no other choice. Our hand is being forced." Source: Quint Forgey/Twiter Rep. Filemon Vela of Texas became a co-sponsor of Tlaib's resolution in late April. Source: CBS  Rep. Jared Huffman of California also co-sponsored Tlaib's resolution in April. Source: CBS Rep. Barbara Lee, who represents a part of California's Bay Area, also co-sponsored Tlaib's resolution. Source: Los Angeles Times As did fellow California Rep. Grace Napolitano. Source: Los Angeles Times Rep. Robin Kelly of Illinois also voted in favor of the 2017 resolution. Source: Robin Kelly Rep. Gwen Moore of Wisconsin was also one of the original members calling for Trump's impeachment back in 2017. Source: WISN/ABC Rep. David Cicilline of Rhode Island came out in support of impeachment after Don McGahn defied a subpoena from the House Judiciary Committee. Source: Rep. David Cicilline/Twitter Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland, a constitutional law professor at American University and a member of the House leadership team, said he supports impeaching Trump in a recent interview with the Washington Post, saying "the logic of an impeachment inquiry is pretty overwhelming at this point." Source: Washington Post Rep. Veronica Escobar of Texas also supports impeachment, writing on Twitter that "we cannot tolerate this level of obstruction." Source: Veronica Escobar House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky supports impeachment and told CNN he believes "a growing majority of our caucus believes that impeachment is going to be inevitable." Source: CNN Rep. Joaquin Castro of Texas tweeted Tuesday, "It’s time for Congress to open an impeachment inquiry. There is political risk in doing so, but there’s a greater risk to our country in doing nothing." Source: Joaquin Castro Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon of Pennsylvania, the Vice Chair of the House Judiciary Committee, came out in support of impeachment on Tuesday. Source: Mary Gay Scanlon Rep. Madeline Dean, also of Pennsylvania, said Tuesday "we must open an impeachment inquiry." Source: MSNBC Rep. Dwight Evans, also of Pennsylvania, wrote "I'm ready to vote in FAVOR of the House of Representatives beginning an impeachment inquiry of President Trump" on Wednesday. Source: Dwight Evans/Twitter Rep. Pramila Jayapal of Washington called for impeachment on May 21, saying, "A president who thinks he's king, accountable to nobody above the law is absolutely unacceptable." Source: Pramila Jayapal/Twitter Rep. Cedric Richmond of Louisiana said in late April on CBS' "Face The Nation" that he believed an impeachment inquiry was "the best way to get all of the facts out." Source: CBS News Rep. Mark Pocan of Wisconsin called for impeachment after McGahn's no-show for his May 21 hearing. Source: Mark Pocan Rep. Joe Neguse of Colorado, a co-freshman representative to leadership, wrote May 21 that "the Administration’s pattern of wholesale obstruction of Congress since the report’s release, make clear that it is time to open an impeachment inquiry." Source: Joe Neguse Rep. Diana DeGette, also of Colorado, came out in favor of impeachment on May 21, writing, "the facts laid out in the Mueller report, coupled with this administration’s ongoing attempts to stonewall Congress, leave us no other choice." Source: Diana DeGette Rep. Val Demings of Florida said she believes "that we're at a point where we've run out of options and I think we should begin impeachment proceedings." Source: MSNBC Rep. Earl Blumenauer of Oregon came out in favor of impeachment on May 21, writing "Trump continues to disrespect the power of Congress, the rule of law, and our democracy." Source: Earl Blumenauer/Twitter Rep. Don Beyer of Virginia wrote May 21 that he supports impeaching Trump, writing "endorsing such a course is not easy ... but I believe the President has left Congress no other option but to pursue it" in a statement. Source: Don Beyer Rep. Jackie Speier of California told CNN on Tuesday she believes "an inquiry into impeachment is required at this point in time." Source: Jackie Speier/CNN "Congress has a moral obligation to put our politics aside and take action," Rep. Kathleen Rice of New York tweeted Tuesday. "We need to start impeachment proceedings." Source: Kathleen Rice/Twitter Freshman Rep. Tom Malinowski of New Jersey came out in support of impeachment in an interview with NBC News, saying, "The law can survive the efforts of bad people to defy it. The law cannot survive the hesitation of good people to defend it." Source: NBC News       Rep. Bennie Johnson of Mississippi, the chair of the Committee on Homeland Security, came out in favor of impeachment on May 29, writing, "the President has egregiously obstructed justice." Source: Bennie Thompson/Twitter   Rep. Greg Stanton, who represents Phoenix, Arizona, supports opening an impeachment inquiry. Source: Rep. Greg Stanton His Arizona colleague Rep. Raúl Grijalva, whose district is located in the Tuscon area, also supports impeachment. Source: Tuscon.com In a May 31 statement, Rep. Alma Adams of North Carolina said she supports opening an impeachment inquiry because "Congress has a sacred responsibility to obtain the information necessary to determine the next steps.” Source: Rep. Alma Adams Rep. GK Butterfield, also of North Carolina, told a North Carolina news station that he is "prepared to vote for an impeachment inquiry and based on the evidence before me now, I am prepared to vote for the impeachment and removal of this president." Source: Tim Boyum/Capital Tonight Rep. Jesus "Chuy" Garcia of Illinois, supports impeachment as well. Source: Chicago Tribune Rep. Betty McCollum of Minnesota said in a May 29 statement: "I fully expect the responsible House committees to expedite their investigations and, as soon as possible, formally draft articles of impeachment." Source: Betty McCollum Fellow Pennsylvania Rep. Brendan Boyle wrote, "it’s time to officially start Impeachment Hearings" on Twitter May 31. Source: Brendan Boyle Rep. Jim McGovern of Massachusetts came out in support of beginning an impeachment inquiry on May 30. Source: Boston Globe Rep. Suzanne Bonamici of Oregon supports an impeachment inquiry, telling Oregon Public Broadcasting that “the president and the administration are sending the message they’re above the law.” Source: Oregon Public Broadcasting A spokesman for Rep. Bobby Rush of Illinois, told NPR that Rush "believes that President Trump should be impeached." Source: NPR Rep. Danny Davis of Illinois said in a May 28 statement, "I believe it is time and imperative that the United States House of Representatives begin an impeachment inquiry." Source: Danny Davis Rep. Paul Tonko of New York came out in favor of impeachment on June 3. Source: WAMC Radio Rep. Mark DeSaulnier of California told the San Francisco Chronicle that he supports impeachment proceedings and further hearings on the matter. Source: San Fransisco Chronicle Rep. Mike Quigley of Illinois, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, came out in support of impeachment on May 31. Source: Rep. Mike Quigley Rep. Norma Torres of California told the Washington Post that she came around to supporting impeachment after reading the Mueller report. Source: Washington Post Rep. Juan Vargas, also of California, said he supported impeachment at an April 23 event in his Southern California district. Source: NBC San Diego Chellie Pingree, who represents Maine's first congressional district, said in a May 29 statement: "I believe it is in the public interest that Congress continue its own investigations in the face of unprecedented obstruction and move toward an impeachment inquiry.” Source: Rep. Chellie Pingree Rep. Alan Lowenthal of California wrote, "I believe the time has come to consider an impeachment inquiry" in a May 30 tweet. Source: Alan Lowenthal/Twitter Rep. Lloyd Doggett of Texas told the Huffington Post that "if inherent contempt is not to be used and no other meaningful action is taken, then impeachment is the only alternative." Source: Huffington Post   Rep. Ted Lieu of California, a Judiciary Committee member, has pushed Pelosi to get behind impeachment proceedings, according to the Washington Post. He told The Post: "This inquiry could lead to impeachment, or it could lead to nothing. But I think if McGahn doesn’t show, we have to at least start it.” Source: Washington Post Rep. Carolyn of Maloney of New York said at a June 15 event that "it is my inescapable conclusion that the House of Representatives must open an impeachment inquiry against the President of the United States." Source: Carolyn Maloney Also on June 15, Rep. Andy Levin of Michigan tweeted that he too supported an impeachment inquiry as the best way to "get to the bottom of Mr. Trump’s activities and inform the public about what we learn." Source: Andy Levin/Twitter Rep. Jimmy Gomez of California told the Los Angeles Times: "I have voted TWICE to start debate on articles of impeachment. And I would do it again in a heartbeat.” Source: Los Angeles Times Rep. Brenda Lawrence of Michigan both voted for impeachment in 2018 and expressed for support for it recently, telling CNN, "we need to hold this president accountable." Source: Brenda Lawrence Rep. Joyce Beatty of Ohio told the Columbus Dispatch: "I ultimately believe this process will lead to an impeachment inquiry, which I would support for the people and to keep America great.” Source: Columbus Dispatch Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, a member of the House Judiciary Committee, said on May 21 that she plans to introduce a "resolution of investigation" to help the committee determine whether an impeachment inquiry is warranted. Source: CNN   Rep. Katie Porter of California came out in favor of supporting an impeachment inquiry in a video posted to Twitter on June 17. Source: Katie Porter/Twitter Also on June 17, Rep. Dan Kildee of Michigan wrote that while he was "reluctant" to back impeachment, but said he believed "Congress must open an impeachment inquiry to defend the rule of law." Source: Dan Kildee/Twitter Rep. Brian Higgins of New York came out in favor of impeachment on June 19, saying, "the multiple instances of obstruction laid out in the Mueller report necessitate that the House launch an impeachment inquiry." Source: Brian Higgins Rep. Jan Schakowsky of Illinois, a member of the House leadership team and a key ally of Pelosi, announced her support for impeachment in a June 19 video posted to Twitter. Source: Jan Schakowsky Rep. Sean Casten of Illinois, who represents a district that flipped from Republican to Democratic control, also told the Chicago Sun-Times he supports an impeachment inquiry. Source: Chicago Sun-Times Rep. Bill Pascrell of New Jersey came out in favor of starting an impeachment inquiry on May 29. Rep. Nydia Velàzquez of New York, the chairwoman of the House Small Business Committee, came out in support of impeachment on June 20. Source: Nydia Velazquez/Twitter Rep. Tony Cárdenas of California also endorsed an impeachment inquiry on June 20 Source: Tony Cardenas/Twitter On June 21, Rep. William Lacy Clay of Missouri signed on as a co-sponsor of both Green and Tlaib's impeachment resolutions. Source: KMOV4 Rep. Adam Smith of Washington, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, said in a June 21 statement to the Seattle Times that he supports impeachment. Source: Seattle Times Rep. Mike Doyle of Pennsylvania also came out in favor of starting an impeachment inquiry in a June 21 statement. Source: Mike Doyle Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell of Florida, a member of the Judiciary Committee, came out in favor of an impeachment inquiry in a June 21 statement. Source: Debbie Mucarsel-Powell/Twitter   Rep. Jim Himes of Connecticut became the 80th Democrat to come out in favor of impeachment on June 24. Source:Jim Himes/Twitter   Shortly after, Rep. Harley Rouda of California told reporters he's prepared to support an impeachment inquiry, telling Politico: "we’re being stonewalled by the administration and president Trump...we’re going through the courts, but if we do an impeachment inquiry we will be able to have the courts move faster in addressing those issues." Source: Jeremy White/Politico Rep. Donald Norcross of New Jersey wrote a June 25 Twitter thread emphasizing his support for impeaching, writing, "as a co-equal branch of government, it is Congress' obligation to hold the executive branch accountable. The future of our country is at stake. No one is above the law." Source: Donald Norcross/Twitter   In a June 26 Twitter thread, Rep. Scott Peters of California endorsed an impeachment inquiry, writing, "If we don’t act, we send the message that criminal behavior is normal for presidents." Source: Scott Peters/Twitter   Rep. Joe Kennedy III of Massachusetts came out in favor of an impeachment inquiry in a June 28 taped interview with WPRI, saying, "I believe that when you have a president that’s willfully broken the law repeatedly to try to evade justice for various illegal acts, Congress has to hold him accountable." Source: WPRI   On July 25, Congresswoman Lisa Blunt Rochester of Delaware announced her support for impeachment proceedings against Trump: "After two years of investigations, hundreds of pages of documents, and hours of testimony, this much is clear — the Russian government waged a sweeping and systematic attack on democracy. Several top Trump campaign officials not only accepted but welcomed the interference." Source: Lisa Blunt Rochester Vice Chair of the House Democratic Caucus Congresswoman Katherine Clark joined in on impeachment calls on July 25. "Throughout his life and presidency, Donald Trump has proven himself unfit to serve. He has no respect for the rule of law, has put kids in cages, regularly tramples on the Constitution, and uses racist words, acts and policies to divide our country." Source: Katherine Clark Congressman Peter DeFazio, Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, announced his support for impeachment proceedings on July 25 citing findings in the Mueller report. "I believe that the time has come for the Judiciary Committee to open a formal impeachment inquiry and collect the evidence necessary to build a strong case against President Trump. His presidency is a danger to our national security and a threat to our democracy." Source: Peter DeFazio Read more: Over a third of House Democrats want to begin an impeachment inquiry against Trump — see all of them here Most Americans say they understand what impeachment is, but fewer than a third can actually define it correctly Trump is reportedly intrigued by impeachment and the boost it could give his approval ratings Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez accuses Nancy Pelosi and other Democrats of 'sitting on their hands' on impeaching Trump http://deming.ipub.us/news/2836439-here-are-87-congressional-democrats-and-9-additional-democra Fri, 26 2019 00:57:00 GMT http://deming.ipub.us/news/2836439-here-are-87-congressional-democrats-and-9-additional-democra The 7 biggest takeaways from Mueller#039;s marathon Capitol Hill testimony The former special counsel Robert Mueller frustrated both Democrats and Republicans when he testified this week before two congressional committees about the Russia investigation. The notoriously tight-lipped former FBI director repeatedly refused to answer questions, or even recite portions from his final report, and instead had one message for lawmakers and the public: read the report yourself. But there were still a few significant takeaways from Mueller's historic testimony. Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories. The former special counsel Robert Mueller took center stage this week when he testified before two congressional panels in back-to-back hearings. The first hearing, before the House Judiciary Committee, focused on Mueller's findings in his obstruction-of-justice investigation into President Donald Trump. The second, before the House Intelligence Committee, centered around Mueller's original mandate: Russia's interference in the 2016 election and whether members of the Trump campaign coordinated or conspired with Moscow to meddle in the race. Congressional Democrats went into the marathon hearings hoping to have the man behind the Mueller report bring the document to life for the majority of Americans who haven't yet read it. But they likely came away disappointed, because the notoriously tight-lipped former FBI director had one message for lawmakers and the public: read the report yourself. Still, there were a few significant takeaways from Mueller's testimony. Scroll down to keep reading:SEE ALSO: Mueller's high stakes congressional hearings went about as badly as they could have for Democrats President Donald Trump was 'generally' not truthful in his written responses to questions from prosecutors. In an exchange with Democratic Rep. Val Demings on the House Intelligence Committee, Mueller suggested the president misled investigators in his written responses to questions. "Isn't it fair to say [Trump's] written answers were not only inadequate and incomplete because he didn't answer many of your questions, but where he did, his answers show that he wasn't always being truthful?" Demings asked. "Generally," Mueller responded. Mueller: We should 'absolutely' hold elected officials to a higher standard than just avoiding criminality. Toward the end of the marathon hearings, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff asked the former special counsel a pointed question: "We should hold our elected officials to a standard higher than mere avoidance of criminality, correct?" "Absolutely," Mueller replied. The answer was a rare, if indirect, rebuke from Mueller of Trump and his supporters' frequent claim that "collusion is not a crime." Mueller excoriated Trump for promoting WikiLeaks during the 2016 election. In one of his sharpest public critiques of the president to date, Mueller tore into Trump for his effusive praise of WikiLeaks. At the second hearing, which took place before the intelligence panel, Democratic Rep. Mike Quigley repeated statements Trump made heaping praise on WikiLeaks during the presidential campaign. "I love WikiLeaks," he said at one campaign rally shortly before the election. "This WikiLeaks is like a treasure trove," he said at another. And at a campaign event on October 31, 2016, he said, "Boy, I love reading those WikiLeaks." "Would any of those quotes disturb you, Mr. Director?" Quigley asked Mueller. "How do you react to them?" "Well," Mueller said, "problematic is an understatement in terms of what it displays in terms of giving some hope, or some boost, to what is and should be illegal activity." Adam Schiff and Mueller engaged in a line of questioning that was devastating to the president and his allies. Mueller was significantly more forthcoming in his testimony to the intelligence committee than to the judiciary committee. Perhaps the most memorable exchange came with Rep. Adam Schiff of California, the intel committee's chairman who is also a former prosecutor. Like other lawmakers with previous prosecutorial experience, Schiff used his time to ask simple yes-or-no questions to the former special counsel instead of making a lengthy speech. The resulting line of questioning cast the White House in a damaging light as Mueller confirmed how Trump and his associates used the campaign and the presidency to profit and later lied to investigators about it. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154085012049977347?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw For all of the talk about Mueller's halting performance, this exchange is why his testimony could have an effect: at just over a minute long, it's almost made for TV and is ideal for social-media shares pic.twitter.com/HYg5azb8VI   Trump challenged Mueller to contradict him, under oath, on a key episode from the report. Mueller did just that. Before the hearings, Trump dared Mueller on Twitter to testify under oath that he did not interview for the FBI director job one day before being appointed special counsel. Mueller did just that, telling lawmakers that he went to the White House, but only because the president had requested his advice and input on who he should tap for the job after dismissing James Comey. The meeting, Mueller said under penalty of perjury, "was about the job, but not about me applying for the job." Mueller on US political campaigns inviting foreign interference: 'I hope this is not the new normal, but I fear it is.' In a telling exchange with Democratic Rep. Peter Welch of Vermont, Mueller offered a stark view of American political campaigns accepting or inviting electoral interference from foreign governments. "Have we established a new normal from this past campaign that is going to apply to future campaigns, so that if any one of us running for the U.S. House ― any candidate for the U.S. Senate, any candidate for the presidency of the United States ― aware that a hostile foreign power is trying to influence an election, has no duty to report that to the FBI or other authorities?" Welch asked. "I hope this is not the new normal," Mueller responded. "But I fear it is." In another exchange with Schiff, Mueller emphasized that accepting foreign help is "unpatriotic" and "wrong." The Russians are continuing to meddle even 'as we sit here.' Asked near the end of his marathon testimony about Russian interference in the US electoral process, Mueller said that not only have they not been deterred, but "they're doing it as we sit here." http://deming.ipub.us/news/2835333-7-biggest-takeaways-mueller039s-marathon-capitol-hill-testim Thu, 25 2019 16:19:27 GMT http://deming.ipub.us/news/2835333-7-biggest-takeaways-mueller039s-marathon-capitol-hill-testim The 9 most revelatory moments from Mueller#039;s testimony So Robert Mueller didn't exactly dazzle during his House hearings. The former special counsel testified before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees on Wednesday about his report on Russian election interference and possible obstruction of justice by President Trump. Mueller ended up avoiding far more questions than he answered, deflecting a solid 198 times, by NBC News' count. But on a couple of occasions he gave viewers a glimpse of insight. Here are nine highlights from Mueller's day on Capitol Hill. 1. "We did not address collusion, which is not a legal term." Anyone who had read Mueller's report would've known this one. But Trump didn't get the message, and just as he broadly tweeted out for the umpteeth time that there was "NO COLLUSION, NO OBSTRUCTION!," Mueller made it clear that wasn't the case. 2. Presidents can be indicted once they're out of office. During his probe, Mueller was beholden to an Office of Legal Counsel policy that bars indicting a president while they're in office. But early in his first hearing, Mueller affirmed House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerrold Nadler's (D-N.Y.) question of whether "the president could be prosecuted for obstruction of justice crimes after he leaves office." Mueller gave that same answer later on to Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colo.). Rep. Ken Buck: "Could you charge the president with a crime after he left office?"Robert Mueller: "Yes"Buck: "You could charge the President of the United States with obstruction of justice after he left office?"Mueller: "Yes" https://t.co/jFAp2RJoaI #MuellerHearings pic.twitter.com/rG1psVL0ib — ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) July 24, 2019 3. Mueller wasn't a candidate for FBI director. Trump claimed in a Wednesday tweet that he had "numerous witnesses" who could affirm Mueller applied and interviewed for the job of Trump's FBI Director the day before he was appointed special counsel. Mueller confirmed to Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas) that he did talk to Trump "about the job," but "not as a candidate." NEW:Robert Mueller, during questioning from @replouiegohmert, states that his meeting with Trump was NOT an interview for the FBI director position"Not as a candidate. I was asked..." https://t.co/sIkt2vPBnv pic.twitter.com/jXpyaV1wSk — Yahoo News (@YahooNews) July 24, 2019 4. There's more to Trump's non-indictment than policy. At first, it seemed that Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.) had pulled a bombshell out of Mueller, asking him if he "did not indict Donald Trump" because of the OLC policy. Mueller answered yes, but when his second hearing started, he took it back. Mueller: “I want to go back to one thing that was said this morning by Mr. Lieu, who said, ‘you didn’t charge the president because of the OLC opinion.’ That is not the correct way to say it." https://t.co/Bk6IKkx97y #MuellerHearings pic.twitter.com/DQ0M5QAR4v — Dan Linden (@DanLinden) July 24, 2019 5. Calling Trump's praise of Wikileaks "problematic" is "an understatement." Rep. Mike Quigley (D-Ill.) couldn't get Mueller to reveal his thoughts on extending a statue of limitations on crimes a president committed in office, but he did elicit one of Mueller's voiciest moments of the whole hearing. Quigley read off quotes from Trump in which he said "I love Wikileaks" in more ways than one, and asked whether Mueller for his reaction. "Problematic is an understatement," Mueller responded, adding that similar comments from Donald Trump Jr. were "disturbing, and also subject to investigation." Democratic Rep. Mike Quigley just read off several quotes from President Trump about WikiLeaks, including "This WikiLeaks is like a treasure trove" and "Boy, I love reading those WikiLeaks."Robert Mueller: "Problematic is an understatement in terms of what it displays..." pic.twitter.com/Uucz6R09rh — CNN (@CNN) July 24, 2019 6. Russia is still a big problem. Multiple U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election, and that their meddling is a growing problem. Mueller particularly emphasized that lawmakers "underplayed" half of his probe, saying that future interference could "cause "long term damage" to the United States and that "we need to move quickly to address" the matter." Rep. Jackie Speier: "Would you agree that it was not a hoax that the Russians were engaged in trying to impact our election?"Robert Mueller: "Absolutely. That was not a hoax." pic.twitter.com/LZOXkuIIAk — PBS NewsHour (@NewsHour) July 24, 2019 7. Russia worked to help Trump, and the Trump campaign was okay with it. House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) elicited some clear and concise responses from Mueller that shot down many of Trump's characterizations of his probe. For starters, Mueller agreed with Schiff's assessment that Russia conducted a "sweeping" effort to influence the 2016 election and "made outreach" to the Trump campaign, and that the Trump campaign "welcomed their help." Mueller also affirmed that his investigation was not a "witch hunt" or a "hoax." Here’s what Mueller said:➡️ Russia interfered in our election to help Trump.➡️ Russians made numerous contacts with the campaign.➡️ Campaign welcomed their help.➡️ No one reported these contacts or interference to FBI.➡️ They lied to cover it up. pic.twitter.com/ePAjUkfMlo — Adam Schiff (@RepAdamSchiff) July 24, 2019 8. Trump's campaign officials lied, and it was a problem. During his probe, Mueller worked out a plea deal with former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen under which he admitted to lying to Congress. Former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort was also ruled to have intentionally lied to Mueller. When Rep. Val Demings (D-Fla.) asked if "lies by Trump campaign officials and administration officials impeded your investigation," Mueller said he "generally" agreed. .@RepValDemings: "Lies by Trump campaign officials and administration officials impeded your investigation."Mueller: "I would generally agree with that."#MuellerHearingshttps://t.co/ZdvLy8Vkbr pic.twitter.com/hFZGhS94GI — Good Morning America (@GMA) July 24, 2019 9. "Expediting the end of the investigation" stopped Mueller from subpoenaing Trump. Early in the first hearing, Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Doug Collins (R-Ga.) asked Mueller if his probe was ever "curtailed or stopped or hindered." Mueller answered "no," but later in the Intelligence hearing, did say he'd have rather had an interview with the president than the written answers he actually got. Here's how Mueller explained the situation to Rep. Sean Maloney (D-N.Y.). "Why didn't you subpoena the president?" Here's how Robert Mueller answered Rep. Sean Maloney's question. pic.twitter.com/fLILbBkowz — PBS NewsHour (@NewsHour) July 24, 2019 http://deming.ipub.us/news/2833705-9-most-revelatory-moments-mueller039s-testimony Wed, 24 2019 21:58:42 GMT http://deming.ipub.us/news/2833705-9-most-revelatory-moments-mueller039s-testimony Mueller#039;s high stakes congressional hearings went about as badly as they could have for Democrats If Democrats hoped Wednesday's high stakes hearings with the former special counsel Robert Mueller would help them shore up public support for President Donald Trump's impeachment, they likely came away sorely disappointed. Mueller frustrated both sides of the aisle with his repeated refusal to answer questions about his findings, the origins of the Russia investigation, his relationship with the attorney general, and other topics related to the probe. "Mr. Mueller is being consistent," Rep. Al Green, the first Democrat to call for Trump's impeachment, told INSIDER. "He's doing what was anticipated — at least, what I anticipated." That said, Democrats did notch a few victories: Mueller excoriated Trump for praising WikiLeaks, he contradicted Trump on a key claim under oath, and he pointedly told lawmakers that elected officials should be held to a higher standard than "mere avoidance of criminality." Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories. The stakes for Democrats could not have been higher when the former special counsel Robert Mueller took center stage on Capitol Hill Wednesday morning. That's why it was all the more painful for them when Mueller's highly anticipated testimony fell significantly short of their expectations.  Mueller appeared before the House judiciary and intelligence committees for two back-to-back hearings. The first, before the judiciary, focused primarily on Mueller's findings in the obstruction of justice investigation into President Donald Trump. The second, which took place before the intelligence panel, zeroed-in on Mueller's counterintelligence findings in the FBI's Russia investigation; namely, the nature of Russia's interference in the 2016 US election and whether members of the Trump campaign coordinated with Moscow's efforts. Before the hearings even kicked off, Democrats were urging caution. Read more: 'The death rattle for impeachment': Republicans take a victory lap after Mueller's testimony misses Democrats' expectations The worst case scenario, one Democratic House aide told the Washington Post early Wednesday, is "that it's a snooze-fest and we put in all of this work and effort for nothing. [Constituents] will be really bummed when they learn nothing new [today]." "Everyone will watch it and nothing will happen," the aide added. 'Mr. Mueller is being consistent' To be sure, the former special counsel frustrated both sides of the aisle with his repeated refusal to answer questions about his findings, the origins of the Russia investigation, his relationship with the attorney general, and other topics related to the probe. Instead, he told lawmakers, "I would direct you to the report." When asked about issues that were not contained in the 448-page document, Mueller said, "I'm not going to discuss other matters." "Mr. Mueller is being consistent," Rep. Al Green, the first Democrat to call for Trump's impeachment, told INSIDER. "He's doing what was anticipated — at least, what I anticipated." Read more: 'Problematic is an understatement': Mueller excoriates Trump for praising WikiLeaks during the 2016 election Indeed, when Mueller gave his first public statement on the Russia investigation in May, he said he would not testify before Congress because "the report is my testimony." He added that if he were subpoenaed — which he was — he would not go beyond stating what was publicly revealed in the report. "I don't think it was necessary to have this hearing," Green said. "I do believe that it's always good to have transparency, but I don't think you have to have this hearing, given that Mr. Mueller has given us a roadmap to impeachment. But it's styled, 'Mueller Report.' If he had styled the report, 'Roadmap to Impeachment,' we wouldn't be having this hearing." Mueller's report said prosecutors did not find sufficient evidence to establish a criminal conspiracy between the Trump campaign and the Russian government related to 2016 election interference. In the obstruction case, Mueller declined to make a "traditional prosecutorial judgment," citing Justice Department guidelines that bar prosecutors from indicting a sitting president. However, the former special counsel laid out an extensive set of obstruction evidence against Trump, and prosecutors noted that if they had confidence that the president did not commit a crime, they would have said so. They also explicitly stated that their report "does not exonerate" Trump. Read more: Mueller says he didn't subpoena Trump because he expected Trump to fight it and wanted to expedite 'the end of the investigation' Prosecutors added that the constitutional remedy for accusing the president of wrongdoing does not lie with the Justice Department — a line many lawmakers believe to be a reference to Congress' impeachment powers. Moreover, they said a president is not immune from criminal prosecution once he leaves office, and Mueller reiterated as much during Wednesday's testimony. 'Bob Mueller is struggling' For those who read Mueller's report, his findings painted a damaging portrait of a campaign that repeatedly welcomed foreign interference in the election and, later, a besieged president whose attempts at obstructing justice were unsuccessful largely because his own aides refused to carry out his orders. But the problem Democrats faced leading up to Wednesday's hearing was that the majority of Americans hadn't read the document. They hoped that they could have the man who wrote the report bring it to life and, in doing so, drum up public support for impeachment. Predictably, Mueller didn't give them what they wanted. "He was clearly a reluctant and tentative witness, and wanted to say as little as he could beyond the report," Julian Epstein, a former Democratic general counsel for the House Judiciary Committee, told Politico. "Anyone who knows Bob Mueller is not the least bit surprised by his reticence today," one former senior Justice Department official who worked closely with Mueller when he was FBI director, told INSIDER. "He's a prosecutor to the core — and he warned everyone he wouldn't go beyond what was contained in his report because the report is his testimony." The Democrats' case was also complicated by the fact that Mueller has been away from the public domain for several years and appears to be out of practice with answering pointed questions from lawmakers. According to Politico, Mueller asked lawmakers to repeat their questions 30 times. He said he wasn't familiar with the so-called Steele dossier, he said he did not recall who Corey Lewandowski — the former Trump campaign manager mentioned several times in Mueller's report — was, he messed up on a question about his prior experience, and he gave an answer which he later had to go back and correct. "Bob Mueller is struggling," Glenn Kirschner, a former federal prosecutor who worked under Mueller in the US attorney's office in Washington, DC, wrote on Twitter. "It strikes me as a health issue. We need only look at footage of his earlier congressional appearances to see the dramatic difference in his demeanor and communicative abilities." Democrats notch a few victories That said, Democrats did gain some capital. In one of his sharpest public critiques of the president to date, Mueller excoriated Trump for his effusive praise of WikiLeaks. "Well," Mueller said, "problematic is an understatement in terms of what it displays in terms of giving some hope, or some boost, to what is and should be illegal activity." At another point, when House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff asked Mueller whether the Trump campaign built its "strategy [and] messaging strategy, around those stolen documents," Mueller responded, "Generally, that's true." "And then they lied to cover it up?" Schiff asked.  "Generally, that's true," Mueller repeated. Mueller also pushed back on Trump's characterization of his investigation, telling Schiff, "It is not a witch hunt." Trump also challenged Mueller on Twitter to testify under oath that he did not interview for the FBI director job one day before being appointed special counsel. Mueller did just that, telling lawmakers that he went to the White House, but only because the president had requested his advice and input on who he should tap for the job after dismissing James Comey. The meeting, Mueller said under oath, "was about the job, but not about me applying for the job." In another exchange with Rep. Val Demings that flew under the radar, Mueller suggested the president misled investigators in his written responses to questions. "Isn't it fair to say [Trump's] written answers were not only inadequate and incomplete because he didn't answer many of your questions, but where he did, his answers show that he wasn't always being truthful?" Demings asked. "Generally," Mueller responded. And toward the end of the marathon hearings, Schiff asked the former special counsel, "We should hold our elected officials to a standard higher than mere avoidance of criminality, correct?" "Absolutely," Mueller replied.SEE ALSO: 'The death rattle for impeachment': Republicans take a victory lap after Mueller's testimony misses Democrats' expectations Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why the US border facilities are 'concentration camps,' according to historians http://deming.ipub.us/news/2833640-mueller039s-high-stakes-congressional-hearings-went-about-ba Wed, 24 2019 21:39:58 GMT http://deming.ipub.us/news/2833640-mueller039s-high-stakes-congressional-hearings-went-about-ba 10 of the biggest moments from more than five hours of Mueller#039;s blockbuster congressional hearings The former special counsel Robert Mueller testified before Congress for the first time on Wednesday in two of the most highly anticipated hearings in recent memory. Mueller's brief and terse answers largely hewed closely to the 448-page report he submitted to Congress in late March and was made public a month later. But the hearing had several moments where lawmakers devolved into rants or offered stout defenses of Trump, while the tight-lipped Mueller broke his silence on issues like election interference. Here are 10 of the biggest moments of the Mueller hearings. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The former special counsel Robert Mueller testified before Congress on Wednesday in two of the most highly anticipated hearings in recent memory. Mueller's brief and terse answers largely hewed closely to the 448-page report he submitted to Congress in late March and was made public a month later. Read more: We hired the author of 'Black Hawk Down' and an illustrator from 'Archer' to adapt the Mueller report so you'll actually read it After a two-year investigation, the former special counsel found that Russia intervened in the 2016 presidential election to help elect President Donald Trump. Despite outlining 11 possible instances of obstruction of justice against Trump in the report, Mueller declined to charge Trump with a crime, citing longstanding Justice Department guidelines against indicting a sitting president.   For more than two decades, Mueller — a lifelong Republican — forged a reputation as a fierce protector of law enforcement's political independence. And Mueller made clear in Wednesday's opening statement that he would not go beyond what he already laid out in his report. "The report is my testimony. And I will stay within that text," Mueller said. Read more: Read Robert Mueller's opening statement to the House Judiciary Committee Mueller testified before the House Judiciary Committee, which focused on possible obstruction of justice by Trump. Then he took questions from House Intelligence Committee on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Democrats control both panels. Yet the mostly calm hearings had several moments where lawmakers devolved into rants or offered stout defenses of Trump, while the tight-lipped Mueller broke his silence on issues like election interference. Here are 10 of the biggest moments of the Mueller hearings.SEE ALSO: Everything you should know about Robert Mueller, who led the government's 2-year investigation into Trump and Russia Democratic Rep. Jerry Nadler of New York accused President Donald Trump of breaking the law in his opening statement for the House Judiciary Committee. Nadler, the chair of the House Judiciary Committee, kicked off the first hearing of the day with a statement praising Mueller for his work and long record of public service. "For 22 months, you never commented in public about your work, even when you were subjected to repeated and grossly unfair personal attacks," Nadler said. "Instead, your indictments spoke for you, and in astonishing detail. Then he charged that Trump broke the law as president. "Any other person who acted this way would have been charged with a crime. And in this nation, not even the president is above the law." Nadler later said that the committee would do its best to follow Mueller's example. "Responsibility, integrity, and accountability. These are the marks by which we who serve on this Committee will be measured as well." Mueller reiterated that Trump "was not exculpated" by his two-year investigation. Under questioning from Nadler about his report's conclusions, Mueller veered from his characteristic short and terse answers to say the report didn't exonerate Trump as he and his Republican allies have claimed. Nadler first asked several yes-or-no questions to establish that Trump wasn't cleared of wrongdoing by Mueller's investigation. Then Nadler asked Mueller to explain his conclusions to the American public. "Now, Director Mueller, can you explain in plain terms what that finding means so the American people can understand it?" Nadler said. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154021549051129857?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw 'The finding indicates that the president was not exculpated for the acts that he allegedly committed': Robert Mueller explains his belief that Trump sought to use his official power 'outside of official channels.' Follow our live coverage: https://t.co/oSfUEpmLBr pic.twitter.com/m5F9n5noJl   "The finding indicates that the president was not exculpated for the acts that he allegedly committed," Mueller responded. Then he confirmed that Trump rejected the former special counsel's request for an interview. Mueller said that Trump could be charged with a crime after he leaves office. During the House Judiciary Committee hearing, Democratic Rep. Ken Buck asked whether the president could be charged with a crime after leaving office. Mueller responded yes. Then Buck asked: "You believe that you could charge the president of the United States with obstruction of justice after he left office?" Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154040802454069249?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw Rep. Buck: "Could you charge the president with a crime after he left office?"Mueller: "Yes."Buck: "You believe that you could charge the president of the United States with obstruction of justice after he left office?"Mueller: "Yes." https://t.co/m9KGQtpbkx pic.twitter.com/Sd1e1B7WMi   "Yes," Mueller said. In the Mueller report, 11 possible instances of obstruction of justice by Trump were outlined. But the former special counsel did not come to "a traditional prosecutorial decision" on the matter.  Mueller defended his investigation after Republican Rep. Tom McClintock blasted him for making "a political case" against Trump. Though Mueller caught a lot of heat from Republicans, he occasionally struck back to defend his work. Rep. McClintock grilled Mueller on the inner workings of his investigation, but Mueller demurred answering his question and said it was outside his boundaries. Then the Republican congressman accused Mueller of investigating Trump out of a political bias against him. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154046212359774208?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw WATCH: In rare retort during his testimony, Mueller defends his report: "I don't think you reviewed a report that is as thorough, as fair, as consistent as the report that we have in front of us." pic.twitter.com/qpYe9BaZbL   "It's starting to look like having desperately tried and failed to make a legal case against the president, you made a political case instead," McClintock said. "You put it in a paper sack, lit it on fire, dropped it on our porch, rang the doorbell and ran." Mueller pushed back against the charge. He countered, "I don't think you will review a report that is as thorough, as fair, as consistent as the report that we have in front of us." Rep. Louie Gohmert yelled at Mueller and accused him of "perpetuating injustice" against Trump during his investigation. The mostly calm hearing took a sharp and strange turn when Republican Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas started his questioning. A stout Trump ally, Gohmert first submitted an article he wrote for Fox News host Sean Hannity's website into the congressional record. It characterized Mueller's investigation as a "coup." Then Gohmert's asked Mueller about FBI agent Peter Strzok's role in the broader Russia investigation. Strzok was removed from the inquiry after it was found that he had sent anti-Trump text messages with Lisa Page, an FBI attorney with whom he had been having an extramarital affair. "When I did find out I acted swiftly to have him reassigned elsewhere in the FBI," Mueller told Gohmert. But Gohmert's line of questioning soon turned into a rant. He defended Trump, saying the president knew he was "innocent" during the investigation and didn't obstruct justice. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154026154287910912?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw Gohmert: "If somebody knows they did not conspire with anybody from Russia to affect the election they see the big [DOJ] with people that hate that person coming after them...the fact that you ran it out 2 years means you perpetuated injustice."Mueller: "I take your question." pic.twitter.com/buO4pqQ2bV   "What he's doing is not obstructing justice. He is pursing justice and the fact that you ran it out two years means you perpetuated injustice," Gohmert said. Mueller responded only with four words: "I take your question." Mueller said that false statements and the deletion of evidence by Trump campaign and administration officials hobbled his investigation. Democratic Rep. Val Demmings of Florida focused her line of questioning on how false information affected Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Mueller acknowledged that he dealt with a range of people who were questioned by his office, including "those not telling the full truth and those who are outright liars." Demmings also asked whether it was correct to say that "lies by Trump campaign officials and administration officials impeded" Mueller's investigation. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154051443441176582?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw Rep. Demings: "Lies by Trump campaign officials and administration officials impeded your investigation."Mueller: "I would generally agree with that."https://t.co/m9KGQtGMJ7 pic.twitter.com/Q5FA8KJWjh   Mueller paused for a few seconds before responding, "I would generally agree with that." Mueller said in a back-and-forth exchange with Rep. Adam Schiff that his investigation was "not a witch hunt." Trump repeatedly accused Mueller to be waging "a witch hunt" against him — and Mueller appeared ready to push back. Asked by House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Adam Schiff about his investigation, Mueller responded that it was not carried out because of any political hostility. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154082948246921216?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw House Intel Cmte. Chairman Schiff: "Your investigation is not a witch hunt, is it?"Mueller: "It is not a witch hunt."Schiff: "When the president said the Russian interference was a hoax, that was false, wasn't it?"Mueller: "True."https://t.co/m9KGQtGMJ7 pic.twitter.com/6v5elmYL8G   "It is not a witch hunt," Mueller flatly said. Mueller agreed with several of Schiff's statements, including that the Trump campaign had appeared to welcome Russia's intervention into the 2016 election and also pursued a business deal in Moscow while he was in the middle of a presidential campaign. And a variety of witnesses caught up in Mueller's broad investigation, including Michael Flynn, Paul Manafort, Michael Cohen and George Papadopoulos, had lied to investigators, he agreed. "A number of persons that we interviewed in our investigation did lie," Mueller said. Mueller starkly criticized Trump's praise of WikiLeaks during the 2016 campaign as "problematic." Mueller gave one his bluntest criticisms of Trump's behavior yet when asked about Trump's praise of WikiLeaks during the 2016 campaign. At the time WikiLeaks published thousands of hacked emails from the Democratic Party, including many from the Hillary Clinton campaign. Democratic Rep, Mike Quigley listed some of Trump's previous statements on WikiLeaks. He once called it "a treasure trove" and said "boy, I love reading those WikiLeaks," making it a staple at many of his campaign rallies. Then he asked Mueller whether those quotes "disturbed" him. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154094177967194113?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw Democratic Rep. Mike Quigley just read off several quotes from President Trump about WikiLeaks, including "This WikiLeaks is like a treasure trove" and "Boy, I love reading those WikiLeaks."Robert Mueller: "Problematic is an understatement in terms of what it displays..." pic.twitter.com/Uucz6R09rh "Problematic is an understatement in terms of what it displays of giving some hope or some boost to what is and should be illegal behavior," Mueller said. He went on to strongly defend his investigation once again, saying "absolutely, it was not a hoax." The former special counsel offered dire warnings about continuing Russian interference in American elections and expects it to happen again during the 2020 presidential campaign. Mueller issued a stark warning of continuing interference in American elections by the Russian government. Rep. Will Hurd of Texas asked Mueller whether he thought that Russia's interference in the 2016 election was a unique attempt that happened once or whether the Russian government planned additional attacks.  Mueller responded that he believed that Russian interference in American democracy to be an ongoing effort and that it wold continue into the 2020 presidential election. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154103214125572096?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw WATCH: Mueller on Russian interference in the 2016 election: "It wasn't a single attempt. They're doing it as we sit here. And they expect to do it during the next campaign."https://t.co/m9KGQtGMJ7 pic.twitter.com/s1Aa1nyLsU   "It wasn't a single attempt. They're doing it as we sit here. And they expect to do it during the next campaign," Mueller forcefully noted. He added that "many more countries" were developing similar capabilities.  "I fear this is the new normal," Mueller said of future political campaigns accepting help from foreign powers. In the hearings, Mueller was uncharacteristically stark on the matter of Russian election interference. Asked by Rep. Peter Welch whether future political campaigns could be more likely to accept foreign help, Mueller responded that he feared the Russian disinformation campaign was ushering in a new dark chapter of American politics. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154109183236747265?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw Rep. Welch: Have we established a new normal from this past campaign ... [that any candidate] aware of a hostile foreign power trying to influence an election has no duty to report that to authorities?Mueller: "I hope this is not the new normal, but I fear it is." pic.twitter.com/MWgDff3Ume "I hope this is not the new normal, but I fear it is," Mueller responded.  http://deming.ipub.us/news/2833487-10-biggest-moments-more-five-hours-mueller039s-blockbuster-c Wed, 24 2019 20:46:28 GMT http://deming.ipub.us/news/2833487-10-biggest-moments-more-five-hours-mueller039s-blockbuster-c Mueller says he didn#039;t subpoena Trump in order to expedite the investigation After hours of non-answers and referrals back to the report, Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.) managed to get a compelling answer out of former Special Counsel Robert Mueller with a very direct question: "Why didn't you subpoena the president?" Mueller in response to Maloney's question about the lack of a subpoena during this House Intelligence Committee hearing explained that his team spent a year attempting to secure an interview with Trump to no avail. "We decided that we did not want to exercise the subpoena powers because of the necessity of expediting the end of the investigation," Mueller said. "The expectation was if we did subpoena the president, he would fight the subpoena, and we would be in the midst of the investigation for a substantial period of time." Trump ultimately answered some questions for Mueller in writing, but the former special counsel admitted during his testimony that these written responses were "certainly not as useful as the interview would be." Maloney seemed critical of this decision by Mueller, suggesting either that he "flinched" or that he "didn't think you needed it" because there was already a "substantial body of evidence" against Trump without an interview. But Mueller, clearly, would directly not comment on this, only saying they had to balance "how much evidence" they had with "how much time" they were "willing to spend in the courts." Later, when asked by Val Demings (D-Fla.) if it's "fair to say that the president's written answers ... showed that he wasn't always being truthful," Mueller said that it "generally" is. "Why didn't you subpoena the president?" Here's how Robert Mueller answered Rep. Sean Maloney's question. pic.twitter.com/fLILbBkowz — PBS NewsHour (@NewsHour) July 24, 2019 http://deming.ipub.us/news/2833415-mueller-says-he-didn039t-subpoena-trump-order-expedite-inves Wed, 24 2019 19:40:33 GMT http://deming.ipub.us/news/2833415-mueller-says-he-didn039t-subpoena-trump-order-expedite-inves LIVE: Mueller says he didn#039;t subpoena Trump because he expected Trump to fight it and wanted to expedite #039;the end of the investigation#039; The former special counsel Robert Mueller appeared before Congress on Wednesday for a blockbuster hearing on his findings in the FBI's Russia investigation. Mueller's team was conspicuously silent during its 22-month-long investigation of Russia's election interference, whether members of President Donald Trump's campaign conspired with Moscow, and if Trump sought to obstruct justice throughout the course of the probe. Wednesday's hearing is the second time Mueller has spoken out publicly about the investigation. Scroll down for live updates. Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories. The former special counsel Robert Mueller appeared before Congress on Wednesday for a historic hearing on his findings in the FBI's investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 US election, and whether President Donald Trump sought to obstruct justice throughout the course of the investigation. According to a lightly redacted version of Mueller's report that was released to the public in April, Mueller did not find sufficient evidence to charge Trump or anyone on his campaign with conspiracy related to Russia's meddling. He declined to make a "traditional prosecutorial judgment" on whether Trump obstructed justice, but his team emphasized that if they had confidence the president did not commit a crime, they would have said so. Read more: Mueller said Trump could be charged with a crime, including obstruction of justice, after he leaves office Mueller's report also implied that the remedy for accusing a sitting president of wrongdoing does not come from the Justice Department, but from Congress. Since then, congressional Democrats have launched a sprawling effort to investigate Trump for potential wrongdoing, and Democratic aides told INSIDER this week that their main objective with Wednesday's hearing is to drum up public support for Trump's impeachment. Scroll down for live updates from the hearing:SEE ALSO: Democrats hope Mueller's highly-anticipated testimony will help them bring his report to life — but their biggest obstacle could be Mueller himself In response to Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney of New York, Mueller explained that he didn't subpoena President Donald Trump because he wanted to "expedite" the end of the investigation and avoid a drawn-out legal battle with Trump. "We negotiated with him for a little over a year," Mueller said. "But when we were almost toward the end of our investigation, we had no success to get the interview of the president, we decided we did not want to exercise the subpoena power because of the necessity of ending the investigations." In an exchange with former CIA officer Rep. Will Hurd, Mueller warned that Russia is planning to interfere in the US 2020 presidential election as well, and "many more countries are developing the capability to replicate what the Russians have done." In response to questioning from both Democrats and Republicans, Mueller repeatedly declined to discuss the origins of the counter-intelligence investigation or the Steele dossier. Mueller confirmed to Rep. Eric Swalwell that his investigation was "hampered" by important witnesses deleting emails and text messages, and witnesses communicating through encrypted apps. Mueller said that "problematic was an understatement" to describe Trump's frequent praise of Wikileaks, which posted hacked materials from the DNC to interfere in the 2016 election. Mueller declined to characterize as it as "providing aid and comfort to an enemy," however.  Rep. Chris Stewart of Utah asked Mueller about the conspiracy theory that someone from the federal government tipped off media outlets about the January arrest of Roger Stone, which Mueller declined to discuss. Mueller also denied that anyone in his office was responsible for anonymously-sourced stories in the Washington Post and New York Times reporting that Mueller's team was unsatisfied with Barr's summaries of their report.  Responding to Rep. Jackie Speier, Mueller said that Russian interference "was not a hoax," adding, "indictments we returned against the Russians were substantial in their scope." In response to a question from Rep. Andre Carson, Mueller agreed that former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort's "contacts with Russians close to Vladimir Putin and his efforts to exchange private information on Americans for money left him vulnerable to blackmail," as Carson phrased it. When Carson asked Mueller whether Manafort's actions constituted a "betrayal" of America's "Democratic values," Mueller responded: "I can't agree with that. Not that it's not true, but I cannot agree with it." In response to questioning from Rep. Jim Himes of Connecticut, Mueller clarified that the Russian interference by computer hacking and on social media was meant to benefit the Trump campaign, but did not speculate as to whether it materially influenced the election outcome. Also in response to Himes' questioning, Mueller said that political campaigns should always report offers of help from foreign governments to the FBI.  In his opening statement, Mueller said, "Over the course of my career, I have seen a number of challenges to our democracy, the Russian government interfering in our election is among the most serious." At the beginning of Mueller's session before the Intelligence Committee, Mueller also clarified that he "did not reach a determination as to whether the president committed a crime," and clearly refuted Trump's frequent claims that his investigation was a "witch hunt," saying, "it's not a witch hunt" for the first time out loud.  GOP Ranking Member Rep. Devin Nunes called the hearing "the last gasp of the Russia collusion theory" and like his colleagues on the Judiciary Committee, criticized the Steele dossier and called claims of collusion "a hoax." At around 1 PM, Mueller returned for another session of testimony before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, led by Chairman Adam Schiff, who gave a damning overview of Russia's efforts to interfere in the 2016 election. "The story of the 2016 election is also a story about disloyalty to country, about greed and lies. Your investigation determined that the Trump campaign and Donald Trump himself knew that a foreign power was intervening in our election, and welcomed its meddling into their strategy and used it," Schiff said, adding, "worse than all the lies and the greed is the disloyalty to country."   Mueller declined to criticize Attorney General William Barr's summaries of his report, which were widely denounced at the time for distorting Mueller's findings and understanding the evidence of obstruction. Mueller gave a long and firm defense of his staff after Rep. Kelly Armstrong of North Dakota pressed Mueller on his staffers' previous political donations and representation of Democrats. "We strove to hire those individuals that could do the job. I've been in this business for almost 25 years, and in those 25 years, I have not had an occasion once to ask somebody about their political affiliation. It is not done. What I care about is the capability of the individual to do the job and do the job quickly and seriously and with integrity," Mueller said.  In response to a question from Rep. Greg Steube of Florida, Mueller thoroughly refuted a frequent claim made by Trump and his allies that Mueller interviewed for the job of FBI director with Trump before being appointed as special counsel. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154052716450029568?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw NEW: Robert Mueller contradicts Trump's claim that he interviewed with Trump for the FBI director job: "My understanding is I was not applying for the job. I was asked to give my input on what it would take to do the job."Trump repeated the claim today https://t.co/kIMl7KRoRt pic.twitter.com/78d2Nrv77r   In response to a question from Rep. Val Demmings of Florida, Mueller said that his investigation was hindered by false statements and deletion of evidence by Trump campaign and administration officials. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154050681055191040?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw DEMINGS: "There were limits on what evidence was available to your investigation?"MUELLER: "That's true."DEMINGS: "Lies by Trump campaign officials and Trump administration officials impeded your investigation."MUELLER: "I would generally agree with that."#MuellerHearings pic.twitter.com/ekE7YRBMQ1   In response to a question from Reps. Ken Buck of Colorado and David Cicilline of Rhode Island, Mueller confirmed that he could indict Trump with a crime after he left office, and that an unsuccessful attempt to obstruct justice is "still a crime." Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154038990003036161?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw Congressman: "Could you charge the President with a crime after he left office?"Mueller: "Yes."#MuellerHearing pic.twitter.com/ZCx89HWfE1   Rep. Matt Gatez of Florida, also a strong Trump ally, gave energetic and animated questioning of Mueller about the Steele dossier, which Mueller explained did not factor into his investigation. Gaetz also questioned Mueller on his brief hiring of former FBI agent Peter Strzok, who was the subject of an internal investigation for exchanging anti-Trump texts with FBI lawyer Lisa Page and left the Mueller team after the texts were discovered.  Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154035938546180098?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw Matt Gaetz is basically the human embodiment of a Hannity monologue. He's grilling Mueller about Christopher Steele and the dossier. pic.twitter.com/gSS40tmpKU   Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio, also a strong Trump ally, gave a fiery monologue in his questioning of Mueller questioning why he didn't charge Joseph Mifsud for lying to the FBI. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154033949867413504?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw Why didn't Mueller charge Joseph Mifsud for lying to the FBI? pic.twitter.com/34E6TSigcM   Mueller got into a tense exchange with Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas, who accused Mueller of "perpetuating injustice" by investigating Trump. Mueller simply responded: "I take your question." Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1154026420043206656?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) gives an impassioned defense of President Trump to explain his actions that could be considered obstruction of justice pic.twitter.com/OUcgx38Vnu   Mueller confirms findings that Paul Manafort shared campaign polling data with the ex-Russian intelligence operative Konstantin Kilimnik but declines to elaborate. Mueller reiterated during the hearing that the Russians believed they would benefit from the victory of a specific 2016 presidential candidate. "It would be Trump," Mueller said. Democratic Rep. Zoe Lofgren also asked Mueller about prosecutors' finding that Paul Manafort, the former Trump campaign chairman, shared confidential polling data in 2016 with Konstantin Kilimnik, a former Russian intelligence operative. But Mueller refused to discuss how the Russians may have used that information to interfere in the campaign, saying, "That's a little bit out of our path." GOP Rep. John Ratcliffe tears into Mueller and says he applied an unfair legal standard to Trump. Republican Rep. John Ratcliffe, a former prosecutor, used his speaking time to rip Mueller's decision — or lack thereof — on the obstruction question. In his report, Mueller said that he did not make a "traditional prosecutorial judgment" on whether Trump obstructed justice because of a 1973 DOJ policy that states a sitting president cannot be indicted. But Ratcliffe slammed prosecutors for highlighting that they if they were confident Trump did not commit a crime, they would have said as much. He also implied that Mueller's team applied an unfair legal standard to the president. "Because there is a presumption of innocence," Ratliffe said, "prosecutors never, ever need to conclusively determine it." Mueller replied, "This is a unique situation," adding that that was why he couldn't exonerate the president. But Ratcliffe interrupted the former special counsel and said Mueller's entire volume on obstruction of justice was not authorized or appropriate. Republicans say they will use the hearing to question Mueller about the origins of the Russia investigation. Georgia Rep. Doug Collins, the ranking member on the committee, hinted that Republicans will use the hearing to question Mueller about the origins of the Russia investigation. The DOJ's inspector general is also currently investigating the matter, and Attorney General William Barr said earlier this year that the results of that investigation will be released sometime this summer. "Those results will be released, and we will need to learn from them to ensure the government's intelligence and law enforcement powers are never again turned on a private citizen or political candidate as the result of the political leanings of a handful of FBI agents," Collins said. Mueller: "My staff and I carried out this assignment with that critical objective in mind: to work quietly, thoroughly, and with integrity so that the public would have full confidence in the outcome." Mueller began his opening statement by establishing that his investigation was conducted thoroughly and fairly. "My staff and I carried out this assignment with that critical objective in mind: to work quietly, thoroughly, and with integrity so that the public would have full confidence in the outcome," he said.   Mueller says he will not address questions about the origins of the Russia probe or the Steele dossier. Mueller also emphasized that he will not address questions related to the origins of the Russia investigation or the so-called Steele dossier, an explosive collection of memos alleging collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. "The report is my testimony, and I will stay within the text," Mueller said. He added, "I will not comment on the actions of the attorney general or of congress. I was appointed as a prosecutor, and I intend to adhere to that role and the department standards that govern it."   http://deming.ipub.us/news/2833333-live-mueller-says-he-didn039t-subpoena-trump-because-he-expe Wed, 24 2019 19:19:00 GMT http://deming.ipub.us/news/2833333-live-mueller-says-he-didn039t-subpoena-trump-because-he-expe Mueller #039;generally#039; agrees that Trump officials#039; lies impeded his investigation For the first several hours of former Special Counsel Robert Mueller's testimony before Congress on Wednesday, the script mostly played out as expected. Mueller adhered to his previous statements that the report was his testimony, which added little in the way of new information. However, he did tell Rep. Val Demings (D-Fla.) that he would "generally agree" with the sentiment that lies by President Trump's campaign and administration officials impeded his office's investigation into 2016 Russian election interference. .@RepValDemings: "Lies by Trump campaign officials and administration officials impeded your investigation."Mueller: "I would generally agree with that."#MuellerHearingshttps://t.co/ZdvLy8Vkbr pic.twitter.com/hFZGhS94GI — Good Morning America (@GMA) July 24, 2019 Mueller also said there is probably a "spectrum of witnesses" who fell somewhere between not telling the full truth and outright lying. He agreed with Demings' assessment that these possible lies placed limits on his investigation, saying that that's "usually the case." However, earlier in the hearing, Mueller was asked by Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.) if his investigation was ever "curtailed or stopped or hindered," to which Mueller replied that it wasn't. .@RepDougCollins: "At anytime of the investigation was your investigation curtailed or stopped or hindered?"Mueller: "No."@JudiciaryGOP #MuellerHearing pic.twitter.com/9EvmelDWYS — Rep. Mike Johnson (@RepMikeJohnson) July 24, 2019 http://deming.ipub.us/news/2832868-mueller-039generally039-agrees-trump-officials039-lies-imped Wed, 24 2019 16:31:59 GMT http://deming.ipub.us/news/2832868-mueller-039generally039-agrees-trump-officials039-lies-imped